Sangria: 2016’s Best Summer Thirst Quencher

sangria2016’s Best Summer Thirst Quencher starts with its humble roots in Spain. Sangria has grown to become a popular, refreshing party drink around the world. In the United States, Sangria was first tasted at the 1964 World’s Fair in New York. The Spanish World area served this fruity wine punch to its visitors, and history was made!

Sangria, according to Lisa Shea at www.wineintro.com, is traditionally a red wine punch. Spanish people from all walks of life enjoy this drink, creating it primarily with Rioja and other Spanish red wines. Sangria can also be made with white wine also known as ‘Sangria Blanco’ (white sangria).

Sangria has been served across Europe for hundreds of years. Looking more specifically at Spain, this region was actively planted with vineyards by the Romans when they swept through about 200BC. A very active wine shipping trade promptly began, with the beautiful wines of Spain supplying much of Rome’s drinking desires. The red grapes grew very well in Spain and Romans liked drinking Spanish wine punches. Read more about sangria from Lisa below.

How do you make it:  Typically created from red wine, fruit juices, soda water, fruit and sometimes brandy. When making your own choose a good quality wine, and if at all possible let the mix chill overnight or longer. The fruit flavors will marry into the wine/cognac mixture. If you want to, use a Spanish Rioja to get the authentic taste. Keeping it local, try equal parts of Nassau Valley Vineyards Laurels Red and Red Neck Rouge. the combination makes a spicy base for red sangria. finish it off with some local blackberries and raspberries. Yum! Looking to keep it white and light? Start with Peggy’s Meadows Edge and get some peaches from Fifer Orchards in Camden, Highland Orchards in Wilmington or Bennett Orchards on Peachtree Lane in Frankford and start sipping the sangria blanco. Don’t forget the cognac or brandy. The recipe that follows from the Sip is easy with just 5 steps. It’s one of the best. Enjoy!

 “The Best Sangria Recipe We Found!” from Bottlenotes, The Sip

  1. Big Red Wine – Authentic Sangria is from Spain and Portugal so ideally, use their big bold reds. Like a Monastrell or a Tempranillo from Spain. Or a Vinho Tinto from Portugal. But the truth is, any big full-bodied red wine will work. So if you’re a Cabernet Sauvignon die-hard, go for it. Just save the Pinot Noir for another day.
  1. Cognac – For every bottle of wine you use, add 3oz of Cognac. The Cognac will fortify the wine, which means it will last much longer. It also means you don’t need to add more sugar. The alcohol in the Cognac adds more than enough sugar.
  1. Spices – Yes, Spices. Spices are what make this recipe so great. So get a get a piece of cheese cloth and throw in some of the following spices.
  • Star Anise
  • Coriander
  • Black peppercorn
  • White Peppercorn
  • Cinnamon sticks
  1. Fruit – Cut up some of your favorite fruits and throw them in too. The sugar from the fruit will seep out into the wine mixture, so again, no need to add more. And that extra sugar in the wine also will make it last longer.
  1. Patience. The longer you let your mixture sit, the better it will taste. Leave it overnight at a minimum but a few days would be better.

Big note before you finally pour yourself a glass though: Don’t eat the fruit!

Unlike your college days, eating the fruit will just taste gross. The Cognac sucked the life (and the sugar) out of it, so it’ll probably taste like cardboard. Just cut up fresh fruit to garnish. And now thanks to the Cognac and the fruit, you can keep this Sangria on your counter and drink it for up to 14 days. No need to add anything. Just fresh fruit. Visit Bottlenotes, for more recipes and interesting content if you like beer, wine and spirits.

More on the History of Sangria

Sangria is based on the traditional red wine punch served across Europe for hundreds of years. Looking more specifically at Spain, this region was actively planted with vineyards by the Romans when they swept through about 200BC. A very active wine shipping trade promptly began, with the beautiful wines of Spain supplying much of Rome’s drinking desires. Red grapes grew very well in Spain and have been enjoyed ever since. The locals named their wine punches, in all their varieties, as Sangria.
Read more about sangria from Lisa Shea at http://www.wineintro.com/sangria/history.html